threegenerationsleft

human activity and the destruction of the planet


Leave a comment

UK aid’s commitment to tackle climate change in Africa

A UK aid package to tackle climate change across Africa has been announced by the International Development Secretary Rory Stewart during a two day visit to Kenya.

International Development Secretary Rory Stewart greets a community member in Loiyangalani, Kenya. Picture: Will Crowne/DFID

International Development Secretary Rory Stewart greets a community member in Loiyangalani, Kenya. Picture: Will Crowne/DFID

The support would help sub-Saharan African countries build resilience to climate change and develop low carbon economies.

Increasing temperatures and extreme weather across the continent are having a profound impact on the lives and livelihoods of communities.

During his visit, the Secretary of State saw first-hand what happens when we do not protect the planet, including damaged natural flood defences; arid, drought-stricken land; and wildlife, the environment and jobs put at risk. He highlighted how tackling climate change is a global problem, and taking on an issue which affects us all will also ultimately benefit the UK.

Over the next five years, the new £250 million UK aid package would ensure UK expertise and experience can help developing countries become more climate resilient and move away from fossil fuels onto cleaner energy sources.

Working in partnership with African governments, organisations and communities, this funding would be the Department for International Development’s (DFID’s) largest single direct climate investment ever in the continent.

The Secretary of State said during his visit to a drought-affected village in Marsabit County in northern Kenya (July 12):

We are facing a global climate emergency. Polluted air, rising sea levels and increasing temperatures are felt by everyone in the world.

We must all play our part to protect the environment, wildlife, vulnerable families and communities – and this includes investing in renewable energy.

I am today announcing DFID’s biggest ever single direct aid investment in climate and the environment across Africa. This builds on my ambition to double DFID’s efforts on this issue globally. Tackling climate change is of direct benefit to everyone living on this planet, including of course in the UK.

African nations are responsible for just 2 to 3% of global emissions, but the continent is set to be the worst affected by the devastating impacts of climate change. Kenya is getting warmer and its rainfall becoming more uncertain.

In the coastal town of Lamu, in southern Kenya, the International Development Secretary heard on Thursday (July 11) about the importance of mangrove conservation. These trees act as a vital natural flood defence protecting communities from storms.

However, they are among the world’s most threatened vegetation and nearly 40% of Lamu’s mangroves have already been destroyed.

The International Development Secretary also visited the UNESCO World Heritage site Lamu Old Town where he heard how UK aid will support sustainable development of the town. While there he announced an additional £10 million towards DFID’s Sustainable Urban Economic Development programme to support urban economic growth in Kenya, which is resilient to climate-related shocks and disasters.

On Friday (July 12), the International Development Secretary met with communities in northern Kenya whose lives have been hit by drought. He announced an extra £4 million UK aid commitment to help prevent malnutrition and the threat of starvation for those living off arid lands in Kenya.

The effects of a changing climate and damage to the environment can already be seen in the village of Loiyangalani, near Marsabit County. In 2017 villagers experienced the worst drought for over five years, with people and livestock threatened by death, disease and starvation.

Wildlife and biodiversity is also under threat. Globally, one million animal and plant species are threatened with extinction. During a visit to Ol Pejeta conservancy in central Kenya, he saw the last two northern white rhino on the planet; a sub-species on the edge of extinction. The combination of cattle herders searching for food for their livestock and human conflict is having an impact on the habitats of rhinos – making them more vulnerable to extinction.

UK aid is helping to preserve the environment where wildlife like rhinos live. It does this in part, by helping cattle herders in Kenya fatten up their cows to earn more from their livestock while helping to manage the land where they graze, so they are not competing so intensely for grassland with such rhinos and other endangered species.

The UK is also working with African nations to deliver an ambitious move to efficient, low carbon technologies. An estimated 600 million Africans currently do not have access to electricity, but UK aid – through its development finance arm CDC and UK private sector investment is helping to support Kenya’s renewable energy sector, by funding the development of the largest onshore wind farm in sub-Saharan Africa at Lake Turkana.

The £250 million climate programme will work across Sub-Saharan Africa, in partnership with African governments and institutions, to increase resilience and support the transition of countries to low carbon economies. The funding will also help build technical expertise across a range of sectors to support the continent to deal with the devasting impacts of climate change and help it move to clean energy sources.



24th July 2019:

International Development Secretary, Rory Stewart, resigned his post in the cabinet on learning that Boris Johnson would become the new Prime Minister.

Since posting the notes above from the Government’s website (gov.uk), an article has appeared in The Guardian warning that much of UK foreign aid is spent on fossil fuel projects, though the study covers the period from 2010.  The figure quoted is £680 million of the foreign aid budget being spent on fossil fuel projects.

Britain allocated more overseas development cash to oil and gas in the two years after signing the 2015 Paris agreement than it had in the previous five, according to the study commissioned by the Catholic development agency Cafod and carried out by the Commons international development committee. Although the UK also increased support for renewables, Cafod said the continued support for carbon-intensive energy in middle-income countries was diverting resources that should be used to help poor communities gain access to electricity from wind and solar power.



 


Leave a comment

Ancient African baobab trees are dying

In a report on the BBC website: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-44418849, international scientists have discovered that many of the oldest baobab trees on the African continent are dying.  Most of the oldest and largest African trees have died in the last 12 years.

200px-Adansonia_grandidieri04

The trees have a characteristic shape, as they store water in their trunks.

Baobabs store water in the trunk (up to 120,000 litres or 32,000 US gallons) to endure harsh drought conditions.[12] All occur in seasonally arid areas, and are deciduous, shedding their leaves during the dry season. Across Africa, the oldest and largest baobabs began to die in the early 21st century, likely from a combination of drought and rising temperatures.[5] The trees appear to become parched, then become dehydrated and unable to support their massive trunks.[6]

Baobabs are important as nest sites for birds, in particular the mottled spinetail and four species of weaver.

It is suspected that the death of the trees is due to climate change.  The trees that have died or are dying are found in Zimbabwe, Namibia, South Africa, Botswana and Zambia. They are all between 1,000 and more than 2,500 years old.

 


Leave a comment

The US withdrawal from the Paris climate accord will hit Africa the hardest: Quartz Media report

 

African countries contribute little to the world’s greenhouse gas emissions but, along with island nations, they still bear the brunt of global warming. Seven out of the world’s 10 countries considered the most threatened by climate change are in Africa.

Temperatures are expected to increase 2°C by the last two decades of this century, a scenario that would put over half of the continent’s population at risk of undernourishment. Already, some 20 million people in South Sudan, Somalia, and Nigeria are at risk of starving to death. Researchers believe rising temperatures contribute to an increase in conflict.

US president Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accords, an agreement signed by 195 countries, including all 55 African countries, is likely to make this worse. Trump has promised to “stop all payments of US tax dollars to UN global warming programs.” Under the Paris accords, developed countries like the US were to contribute to a $100 billion annual fund for developing countries by 2020.

African countries especially need these funds to expand clean energy and deal with climate change. By 2050, the costs of adapting to climate change may cost the continent as much as $50 billion a year, according to a report from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). That’s assuming international efforts keep global warming below 2°C this century continue.

How African countries deal with climate change is also important to the survival of the accord. As African cities and populations expand the continent’s global share of emissions is expected to grow from 2% to 3% by 2040. The Paris agreement now accounts for 65% of all emissions, compared to more than 80% with the US.

Coastal African cities most at risk of flooding, due to the rise in sea level are:

Abijan (Cote d’Ivoire); Lagos (Nigeria); Cape Town and Durban (South Africa); Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) and the coastal cities of North Africa, such as Alexandria, Casablanca, Tripoli and Tunis.

Other parts of Africa are at risk of rising temperatures and drought.

FEWS_Eastern_Africa_July-September_projection

The FEWS (Famine Early Warning Systems) projection of the 2011 East Africa drought for October-December, using the IPC scale:  copied from Wikepedia.

Effects of drought in Somalia

2017213636225446312797675E21B0160-2