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human activity and the destruction of the planet


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Arctic is now locked into destructive climate change: new UN Report

According to a new commissioned UN Report, there is no chance now of saving the arctic from devastating destruction:

http://www.grida.no/publications/431

The report describes scenarios where arctic winter temperatures increase by 3-5 degrees by 2050, compared to 1986-2005 levels, and by 5-9 degrees by 2080.  It is expected to happen regardless of the success of measures introduced since the Paris climate change Agreement in 2015.

According to the report, even if global emissions were to stop overnight, winter temperatures in the Arctic would continue to rise by up to 5 C by 2100 compared to average temperatures in the late 20th century. The temperature rise is described by the report as “locked in” because of greenhouse gases already emitted and heat stored in the ocean. This is because carbon emissions and greenhouse gas emissions have a delayed effect; the emissions being produced today (and which continue to be produced) will have effects for decades. The momentum of climate change is very strong in the Arctic.

According to the report, this would devastate the region and cause sea level rises across the world.

jan-dusik

Jan Dusic, author of the report

A massive melting of ice and a thawing of the permafrost is to be expected, threatening biodiversity and changing the living conditions of Arctic communities.

It appears that the thawing trend is now irreversible.

For further details, see:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/arctic-warming-locked-in-1.5056548?cmp=rss



And now, another report about changing Arctic temperatures from the Washington Post on 14th May 2019:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/it-was-84-degrees-near-the-arctic-ocean-this-weekend-as-carbon-dioxide-hit-its-highest-level-in-human-history/ar-AABlBAQ?fbclid=IwAR2zQVt-AncQSZMfLRquEWKScHGttqeTsqJMTzfboKoz0a8-zoguLE1sREk

“Over the weekend, the climate system sounded simultaneous alarms. Near the entrance to the Arctic Ocean in northwest Russia, the temperature surged to 84 degrees Fahrenheit (29 Celsius). Meanwhile, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere eclipsed 415 parts per million for the first time in human history.”

CarbonData

The recordings were taken in Arkhangelsk, Russia, where the average high temperature is around 54ºF this time of year. The city of 350,000 people sits next to the White Sea, which feeds into the Arctic Ocean’s Barents Sea.

The abnormally warm conditions in this region stemmed from a bulging zone of high pressure centred over western Russia. This particular heat wave, while a manifestation of the arrangement of weather systems and fluctuations in the jet stream, fits into what has been an unusually warm year across the Arctic and most of the mid-latitudes.

These changes all have occurred against the backdrop of unremitting increases in carbon dioxide, which has now crossed another symbolic threshold.

Saturday 11th May’s carbon dioxide measurement of 415 parts per million at Hawaii’s Mauna Loa Observatory is the highest in at least 800,000 years and probably over 3 million years. Carbon dioxide levels have risen by nearly 50 percent since the Industrial Revolution.



 


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The US withdrawal from the Paris climate accord will hit Africa the hardest: Quartz Media report

 

African countries contribute little to the world’s greenhouse gas emissions but, along with island nations, they still bear the brunt of global warming. Seven out of the world’s 10 countries considered the most threatened by climate change are in Africa.

Temperatures are expected to increase 2°C by the last two decades of this century, a scenario that would put over half of the continent’s population at risk of undernourishment. Already, some 20 million people in South Sudan, Somalia, and Nigeria are at risk of starving to death. Researchers believe rising temperatures contribute to an increase in conflict.

US president Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accords, an agreement signed by 195 countries, including all 55 African countries, is likely to make this worse. Trump has promised to “stop all payments of US tax dollars to UN global warming programs.” Under the Paris accords, developed countries like the US were to contribute to a $100 billion annual fund for developing countries by 2020.

African countries especially need these funds to expand clean energy and deal with climate change. By 2050, the costs of adapting to climate change may cost the continent as much as $50 billion a year, according to a report from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). That’s assuming international efforts keep global warming below 2°C this century continue.

How African countries deal with climate change is also important to the survival of the accord. As African cities and populations expand the continent’s global share of emissions is expected to grow from 2% to 3% by 2040. The Paris agreement now accounts for 65% of all emissions, compared to more than 80% with the US.

Coastal African cities most at risk of flooding, due to the rise in sea level are:

Abijan (Cote d’Ivoire); Lagos (Nigeria); Cape Town and Durban (South Africa); Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) and the coastal cities of North Africa, such as Alexandria, Casablanca, Tripoli and Tunis.

Other parts of Africa are at risk of rising temperatures and drought.

FEWS_Eastern_Africa_July-September_projection

The FEWS (Famine Early Warning Systems) projection of the 2011 East Africa drought for October-December, using the IPC scale:  copied from Wikepedia.

Effects of drought in Somalia

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